More Herbs for Container Gardens – Kitchen Herb Garden – A Chef’s Dream, A Gourmet’s Delight

More herbs for container gardens – a continuation of a previous listing.

There’s nothing like an herb container garden just outside the kitchen door to inspire a chef and bring out the creativity of a gourmet. Whether your container garden is outside the door, on planted in an indoor window box in a sunny window, having a choice of more herbs for container gardens will brighten both your day and your cooking.

Look over the following list below and see if there are any herbs you would like to include in your kitchen herb garden to have handy for seasoning your meals or scenting your surroundings.

Marjoram
Best Climate and Site: Zones 9-10; Full sun
Growth Pattern: Bushy, tender perennial. Often treated as an annual. Height 8-24″
Growing Guidelines: Start indoors six weeks before last frost date. Transplant after danger of frost has passed. Bring indoors to winter over in cold climates.
Comments: A relative of oregano, the aroma is similar to oregano, but sweeter and more balsam-like. Many culinary uses. Used in salads, dressings, meat, sausage and lamb dishes, also in beans and soups.

Mint
Best Climate and Site: Zones 4-9; Full sun/partial shade
Growth Pattern: Perennial plant with upright growth; height 18-36″
Growing Guidelines: Sow seed indoors six weeks before last frost date. Transplant after danger of frost is passed. Thrives in moist locations. Propagate from small plants that spring up along the roots or from cuttings. Mint spreads rampantly, which is a good reason to keep it planted in a container.
Comments: Sprigs of mint are used to enhance iced drinks. Used in sauces, vegetables, and goes especially well with lamb dishes.

Oregano
Best Climate and Site: Zones 5-9; Full sun
Growth Pattern: Herbaceous, shrubby, perennial; Height 12-30″
Growing Guidelines: Sow seed indoors six weeks before last frost date. Transplant after danger of frost is passed. Maybe grown from cuttings of a mature plant or by division.
Comments: Widely used in Italian dishes, tomato sauces, pizza, fish and salad dressings. Pot some up to be grown indoors during the winter months.

Parsley
Best Climate and Site: Zones 5-9; Full sun/partial shade
Growth Pattern: Biennial grown as an annual. Height 16-24″.
Growing Guidelines:Can be sown directly after danger of frost is past. May be sown indoors and transplanted after last frost date. For highest yields provide ample water and fertilizer.
Comments: Kitchen gardens always include parsley since it is required in so many recipes. Pot up and bring indoors for winter use.

Rosemary
Best Climate and Site: Zones 7-10; Full sun; Well drained, slightly alkaline soil
Growth Pattern: Tender, perennial evergreen tree; 2-6′
Growing Guidelines: Germination from seed is naturally slow and variable. Best bought as a potted plant. Take cuttings from new growth in the fall to propagate new plants.
Comments: Rosemary is a highly scented herb used to season meat, poulty, fish, and potatoes. Potted plants may be brought into a sunny greenhouse for the winter; or keep them at 45 degrees in a sunny garage or enclosed porch.

Sage
Best Climate and Site: Zones 4-8; Full sun/partial shade
Growth Pattern: Shrubby perennial w/woody stems; Height; 1-2′
Growing Guidelines: Sow seed outdoors in late spring or indoors in late winter. Take cuttings or divide older plants in spring or fall to propagate. Plant will produce well for several years and then begin to decline.
Comments: Used in sausages, poultry, stuffings, vegetables, and eggs.

Savory-Summer
Best Climate and Site: Zones 4-10; Full sun
Growth Pattern: Annual bush; Height 10-18″
Growing Guidelines: Can be sown directly after danger of frost is past. May be sown indoors and transplanted after last frost date.
Comments: Peppery flavor adds spice to dishes. Used in flavoring beans, cabbage, sauerkraut, and potatoes

Savory-Winter
Best Climate and Site: Zones 4-8; Full sun
Growth Pattern: Perennial bush; Height 6-12″
Growing Guidelines: May be sown outside in spring. However, seed germinates slowly. You may prefer to buy plants. Can be propagated from mature plants by cuttings or dividing older plants in spring and fall.
Comments: Cousin to summer savory. Flavor is more pungent and peppery. This herb has been used in cooking for over 2,000 years.

Stevia
Best Climate and Site: Zones 9-11
Growth Pattern: Bushy annual. Height; 18-24″ Plant after last frost when nights are at least 45 degrees.
Growing Guidelines: Can be sown directly after danger of frost is past. May be sown indoors and transplanted after last frost date.
Comments:Incredible sweet leaves are a natural sugar-free alternative to sugar. 30 times sweeter than sugar. Use as a garnish on food and in drinks for a natural sweetener. Use fresh, dried, powdered, or liquid. Tropical plant. Tooth decay inhibitor and plaque retardant. Interesting plant to grow in your indoor kitchen herb garden

Tarragon
Best Climate and Site: Zones 4-8; Full sun/partial shade
Growth Pattern: Hardy perennial with long stems; Height 2-4′
Growing Guidelines: Cannot be grown from seed. Purchase plants. Take cuttings from new growth in the fall, overwintering the young plants indoors until the following spring. You can also divide mature plants in spring every three years. Prune away flower stems each year for most vigorous growth and robust flavor.
Comments: Tarragon’s heavy licorice flavor holds well in cooking, making it very desirable in the kitchen. Used to season chicken dishes.

Thyme
Best Climate and Site: Zones 5-9; Full sun/partial shade
Growth Pattern: Hardy perennial; Height 6-15″
Growing Guidelines: Sow seed in late winter indoors or purchase established plants. Plant outdoors in late spring. For propagation, mature plants can be divided in spring or take cuttings in late fall or winter.
Comments: Classic culinary and ornamental herb. Use to season meats, poultry, stews, sauces, and dressings. Many varieties to suit every taste and location. Easily grown.

 

 

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